Part 3
Thirteen Pence to the Shilling
Queen Victoria Bronze Issues

From the Shield on an 1870 Proof One Thirteenth of a Shilling


From the Shield on an 1870 Proof One Thirteenth of a Shilling

     Since the price of copper was becoming expensive, it was decided by the States to change the metal composition of their coinage.  On December 8, 1864, £2000 worth of bronze coins (or as the act reads “as the copper money lately coined in England”) was authorized.  These bronze coins have a coroneted bust, an oak-leaf scroll, and the denomination written instead of using a fraction.  The initial 1866 issue consisted of 173,333 pence and 173,333 halfpence, which equates to £1000.  As for the old copper coins, an act, dated January 29, 1869, ordered their withdrawal for recoining into the new bronze coins. 

     It was during this time, that the merchants of Jersey were getting frustrated with having 13 pence to the shilling instead of the English standard of 12 pence to the shilling.  The Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury on March 15, 1870 recommended to the States whether advantage should be taken at this time to assimilate the bronze coinage of Jersey with that of the United Kingdom.  On March 31, 1870 the response was that the “States of the Island are not disposed to change the nominal value of their copper coinage.”1  Finally on February 25, 1876, at act passed stating that Jersey coinage would be denominated as a 12th, 24th, and 48th of a shilling following the English standard.  The old coins based upon 13 pence to the shilling were demonetized on December 31, 1876.2 

Things to note about this series:







reverse

The Obverse from an 1866 One Twenty-Sixth of a Shilling
Note the striations beneath the chin and the curl.


One Twenty-Sixth of a Shilling
1866, 1870, and 1871


One Twenty-Sixth of a Shilling
1866, 1870, and 1871


    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter     
    1866    39     4    173,333    24.25    1x 2x 4x      
    1870    40          173,333    24.25    1x 2x 4x       
    1871    41          173,333    24.30    1x 2x 4x  
     In The Standard Catalog of World Coins, Krause states the mintages for both the half penny and penny for 1870 and 1871 as 160,000.  Unfortunately, Krause used 12 pence to the shilling instead of the correct 13 pence to the shilling to compute their numbers.  Pridmore, Marshall-Fraser, and McCammon all agree that the correct number should be 173,333. 

Things to note:

1866 pattern
Unique Bronze Pattern 1/26 shilling, undated (1866),
as currency issue but without obverse legend


1866 with LCW
Proof 1866 1/26 shilling with the LCW

1866 without LCW
Proof 1866 1/26 shilling without the LCW


One Thirteenth of a Shilling
1866, 1870, and 1871

One Thirteenth of a Shilling
1866, 1870, and 1871


    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter     
    1866     9     5    173,333   29.35      1x 2x 4x     
    1870    10          173,333   29.35      1x 2x 4x      
    1871    11          173,333   29.35      1x 2x 4x      
Things to note:

From the Shield on an 1871 Proof One Thirteenth of a Shilling









reverse

The Obverse from an 1870 One Thirteenth of a Shilling







reverse

The Reverse from an 1870 One Thirteenth of a Shilling







obverse of the 1871 penny

The Obverse from an 1871 One Thirteenth of a Shilling







reverse of the 1871 penny

The Reverse from an 1871 One Thirteenth of a Shilling

international banknote

The International Bank operated from 1865 through 1868

1870 half penny obverse

1870 half penny reverse

The 1870 One Twenty-Sixth of a Shilling

bankers magazine
From the May issue of the Bankers' Magazine, Journal of the Money Market, and Commercial Digest.  Volume XXXIV.  January to December, 1874.  Page 418.



antiquary
From the “The Antiquary” of August 12, 1871

1.  HO 45/8231, Jersey:  Coinage:  substitution of bronze for copper and the suggestion that the islands' coinage assimilate that of England. 1869 - 1870.  Home Office Papers, The Public Record Office, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK.

2.  W. A. Browne,  The Merchants' Handbook of Money, Weights and Measures, with their British Equivalents (London, 1879).  p. 22.

3.  Lobel, Davidson, Hailstone, and Calligas,  Coincraft's Standard Catalogue of the Coins of Scotland, Ireland, Channel Islands & Isle of Man (London:  Polestar Wheatons Ltd., 1999).  pp. 320 and 321.







From the Shield on an 1871 Proof One Thirteenth of a Shilling

Some Reviews
Concerning the Coins and Banknotes




From “The GentleMan's Magazine” of July 1866



From “Frasier's Magazine New Series,
Volume XII,
July To December 1875”


Go Back to the previous 13 Pence section
or goto

home, tokens, 1/12th of a shilling, decimal, one pound, or commemoratives