Part 4
Twelve Pence to a Shilling
Queen Victoria

From the Shield on an 1877 Proof One Twenty Fourth of a Shilling


From the Shield on an 1877 Proof One Twenty Fourth of a Shilling

     Following the act of February 25, 1876, Jersey coinage would be denominated as a 12th, 24th, and 48th of a shilling following the English standard.  The new coins of 1877 are the same size, although not the same weight as their English counterparts.  The obverse has a dexter coroneted bust of Queen Victoria, with a seven pointed star with the legend “VICTORIA D. G. BRITANNIAR. REGINA F.D.”  The legend in English is “Victoria, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith.”  Leonard Charles Wyon engraved both the obverse and the reverse of the new coin.  The 1876 Coinage Committee requested the reverse to be “similar to, though not an exact copy of the Channel Islands' Exhibition Medal 1871, which also contains other arms than those of the Island.  As regards [to] the obverse, the Committee is particularly desirous of retaining that of the Jersey coinage, one penny and one half penny pieces of which are herein enclosed -- the only alteration needed being the substitution of the year 1876 for 1866, or 1870.”1  J. B. Payne designed this 50 mm medal and his name appears at the bottom of the medal. 

     While working on the reverse, L. C. Wyon wrote to the Royal Mint on November 4, 1876, concerned about the missing spots on the beasts.  Were the beasts lions or leopards?  The Bailiff assured the Royal Mint in a November 7, 1876 letter that the leopards on the previous coins were a mistake and the animals were actually lions.2  However, the Bailiff was incorrect about the nature of these cats.  Some understanding of heraldry is necessary for any numismatist, especially regarding tinctures (colors).  Vertical lines are red (gules) and dots are gold (yellow).  Thus on the older coins, we have passant, guardant, yellow lions on a red shield.  Mr. Wyon, based upon the Bailiff's directions, updated the shield from “leopards” to “lions” by removing the dots.  He did keep the lines on the shield.  The shield itself is a heater shape shield and it divides the date. The wording “STATES OF JERSEY” is around the upper half of the reverse, with the denomination around the lower half.  This design lasted until 1923, when a square shield, in addition with scrolls, was restored. 

Things to note about this series:

One Forty-Eighth of a Shilling
1877

One Forty-Eighth of a Shilling
1877


    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter       
    1877    58A    6  Proof Only  20.3        Mag   Mag   Mag   wow 
    1877H   59          288,000   20.3        Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples    Letter   Mint  
     This issue was withdrawn in May 1881, except for 38,400 pieces.  (McCammon states that 38,240 pieces remained, but this is not in agreement with the Royal Mint documents.)  The withdrawn coins were returned to the Royal Mint and melted for the 1881 one twelfth of a shilling coinage.4 

Things to note:


Ruined Arch at Grosnez
from the 1879 edition of Blacks's Guide to the Channel Islands
edited by David Ansted

One Twenty-Fourth of a Shilling
1877, 1888, and 1894

1877 half penny obverse 1877 half penny reverse

One Twenty-Fourth of a Shilling
1877, 1888, and 1894

1877 half penny obverse 1877 half penny reverse
    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter       
    1877    42B    7  Proof Only  25.57       Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples   wow 
    1877H   42          336,000   25.57       Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples    Letter   Striations   
    1888    43          120,000   25.57       Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples    Letter   Striations  
    1894    44          120,000   25.57       Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples    Letter  
 
     Like all 1877 coins, the Royal Mint engraved the dies .  The Heaton mint of Birmingham undertook the production of the 1877 coinage and added the familiar H mint mark. 

     As mentioned earlier, there seems to be a difference of opinion on the correct mintage of various Jersey coins.  For this grouping, the Jersey 1888 penny and half penny figures are in question.  Krause and Pridmore state the mintages as 180,000 for the penny and 120,000 for the half penny.  McCammon's and Marshall-Fraser's numbers are 195,000 and 130,000.  In 1888, £750 of pennies and £250 of half pennies were ordered from the Royal Mint.  Their numbers are computed based upon the old 13 pence to the shilling instead of the correct 12 pence to the shilling. 

     In 1887 French bronze coins were once again declared not to be legal tender in Jersey. 

Things to note:

One Twelfth of a Shilling
1877, 1881, 1888, and 1894

1877 penny obverse 1877 penny reverse

One Twelfth of a Shilling
1877, 1881, 1888, and 1894

1877 penny obverse 1877 penny reverse
    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter       
    1877    12C    8  Proof Only  30.70      Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples  
    1877H   12          240,000   30.70      Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples    Letter   Striations   
    1881    13           75,153   30.85      Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples    Letter   Mint  
    1888    14          180,000   30.85      Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples    Letter   Striations   
    1894    15          180,000   30.90      Mag   Mag   Mag   Examples    Letter  
Things to note:




1877 farthing obverse


1877 farthing reverse

A proof only 1877 1/48th of a Shilling (Note the Missing H Mint Mark)

1877 half penny obverse


1877 half penny reverse
The 1877 One Twenty-Fourth of a Shilling









The Obverse from an 1877 One Twelfth of a Shilling









The Reverse from an 1877 One Twelfth of a Shilling







The Obverse of the 1871 Channel Islands'Exhibition Medal







The reverse of this medal was used as model for the new coinage of 1877.

e562 banknote

The Channel Islands Bank was established in 1858 and was taken over by London & Midland Bank in 1898.

1.  HO 45/9339/21933, Channel Islands - Jersey:  Introduction of new copper (Bronze) coinage.  1873 - 1876.  Letter dated September 8, 1876.  Home Office Papers, The Public Record Office, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK.

2.  Numismatic Circular, from Spink and Son, Vol. 88, no. 6 (June 1980), pp. 213 and 214.  The Reverse Design of Jersey Coinage.

3.  MINT 12/4, Correspondence concerning the recoinage of Jersey bronze farthings into Jersey bronze pence.  The Public Record Office, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK.

Queen Victoria Painting
During Queen Victoria's reign, only 12 years had coins produced for Jersey.
(Queen Victoria by Sir David Wilkie, 1840.)

Blacks Magazine of 1879
From the 1879 edition of Black's Guide to the Channel Islands.


Old Cromlech, Formerly Near St. Helier's
from the 1879 edition of Blacks's Guide to the Channel Islands



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Twelve Pence to a Shilling - Queen Victoria,
Twelve Pence to a Shilling - King Edward VII,
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