Part 8
Twelve Pence to a Shilling
Queen Elizabeth II

     Although one twenty fourth of a shilling coins were not minted during Queen Elizabeth's reign, Jersey issued various coins including two new denominations:  a one fourth of a shilling and a five shillings crown.  During this time, three commemorative one twelfth of a shilling coins were also struck.  These were the Island Liberation issue, the 300th Anniversary of Accession of King Charles II issue, and the 900th Anniversary of the Norman Conquest commemorative issue.  Two other denominations were also struck for this occasion:  a five shillings coin and a one fourth of a shilling coin. 

      The obverse depicts Cecil Thomas' famous crowned portrait of the H.M. Queen Elizabeth II.  This design also appears on the coins from Belize, Bermuda, British Eastern Caribbean Territories, British Honduras, British West Africa, Cyprus, East Africa, Fiji, Ghana, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Malaya and British Borneo, Mauritius, Nigeria, and Seychelles.  The obverse has a simple legend of “QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND.”  The reverse of each coin is a slight modification of Kruger-Gray's shield design.

Things to note about this series:

This portrait of the Queen is adapted from a painting by Pietro Annigoni
and can be found on the banknotes issued during the 1960s. 
The portrait is regarded by many as one of the finest portrayals
of the young Queen. 

Isle of Man, Malta, Rhodesia, Trinidad and Tobago, Seychelles,
East Caribbean States, Mauritius, and Fiji used this portrait
on their banknotes too.


One Twelfth of a Shilling
1945 Liberation Commemorative

One Twelfth of a Shilling
1945 Liberation Commemorative

    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter  
    1945    29    20    720,000   30.80          
      For the first coins depicting the new Queen, it was decided to continue using the same reverse as the previous coinage.

Things to note:
Things to note:

One Twelfth of a Shilling
1957 and 1964

One Twelfth of a Shilling
1957 and 1964

    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter   
    1957    30    21    720,000   30.80         
    1964    32    21  1,200,000   30.80         
      In 1957 the coinage was re-designed with a couple of minor but important changes.  Since there were adverse comments on the Queen's name appearing upside down, the effigy is now smaller and moved downward, while the legend is now centered around the top.  For the reverse, the title of the Island is now “THE BAILIWICK OF JERSEY.” 

Things to note:


One Twelfth of a Shilling
1960 300th Anniversary of Accession of King Charles II

One Twelfth of a Shilling
1960 300th Anniversary of Accession of King Charles II

    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter  
    1960    31    23  1,200,000   30.80         
     After the execution of Charles I in 1649, Jersey was the first place to proclaim his son King Charles II.  (It was not until the end of the English Civil War in 1660, that he was actually crowned king in England.)  On November 28, 1663, King Charles II presented to the Bailiff of Jersey the Royal Mace in gratitude for the loyalty and kindness he received during his two stays on the Island during the Civil War.  The Royal Mace is considered by many as one of the finest maces of the 17th century.  It consists of 11 pieces and is made of silver gilt.  The mace is 4' 9.5" long and weighs over 237 ounces (14 pounds, 13 ounces).  This coin commemorates his stay in Jersey. 

Things to note:


One Twelfth of a Shilling
Obverse of the 1961 British Caribbean Territories Two Cents with
the Reverse of the 1960 Jersey One Twelfth of a Shilling

One Twelfth of a Shilling
Obverse of the 1961 British Caribbean Territories Two Cents
Reverse of the 1960 Jersey One Twelfth of a Shilling

    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter  
    1960    31B   24         ??     30.80         
     These coins were produced when the Royal Mint accidentally used a wrong obverse die when minting the 1960 proof sets.  At first glance, the incorrect die appears to be the one used on the 1945 Liberation issue.  However, the Royal Mint destroyed these dies when the new design was introduced in 1957.  The incorrect die is a British Caribbean Territories two cents die. The British Caribbean Territories two cents coin was the only coin of the same size, weight and alloy of the Jersey penny and incidentally had the inscription below the effigy.  Although proof specimens of the British Caribbean Territories two cents coin and the Jersey penny were struck at the Royal Mint in each of the years 1961, 1962, and 1963, there was only one time, viz. from August the 8th through the 22nd, 1961 when obverse dies of both coins were held in the coin processing room die store.1  Evidently it was during this time period when the Royal Mint manufactured eighteen two cents proof coins for the Mint Museum, which this die was inadvertently used for the Jersey coins.  As for the number of coins produce, an exact number is impossible to determine.  However, it would be reasonable to assume that some coins were produced after August 22 and until late September when the order was completed.  Also, we can assume that some coins were produced before August 8 and that striking continued concurrently with the striking of the Caribbean two cents coins.  These mule coins are a tiny sub-set of the total mintage and thus, this coin is a modern rarity. 


One Twelfth of a Shilling
1966 Norman Conquest Commemorative

One Twelfth of a Shilling
1966 Norman Conquest Commemorative

    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter 
    1966    33    26  1,200,000   30.80         
      In 1966, Jersey celebrated the 900th anniversary of the Norman Conquest and its unique links with England.  The Island has “peculiar” privileges obtained through a series of royal charters which has resulted in Jersey being officially known in the constitutional terms as “A Peculiar of the Crown.”  In 1204, King John lost his lands in Normandy to the French but, Jersey and the other Channel Islands, which were also part of the Duchy of Normandy, sided with the King and Jersey has remained predominantly royalist since that time.  These coins were minted to mark this special anniversary.

Things to note:


One Fourth of a Shilling
1957 and 1960

One Fourth of a Shilling
1957 and 1960

    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter
    1957    60    22  2,000,000   21.05
    1960    61A           3,600           (Proof Only) 
Things to note:


One Fourth of a Shilling
1964

One Fourth of a Shilling
1964

    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter
    1964    62    25  1,200,000   21.1
Things to note:

Jersey's second series of banknotes depicts this portrait of Her Majesty.  This portrait of Her Majesty is adapted from a photograph taken prior to a Royal Tour of India and Pakistan.  This is one of the more widely used images of The Queen. 


One Fourth of a Shilling
1966 Norman Conquest Commemorative

One Fourth of a Shilling
1966 Norman Conquest Commemorative

    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter
    1966    63    27  1,200,000   21.1         
Things to note:


Five Shillings
1966 Norman Conquest Commemorative

Five Shillings
1966 Norman Conquest Commemorative



    Year    J#    KM#   Mintage  Diameter
    1966    64    28    300,000   38.60         
      As early as August 21, 1964 the Treasurer of the States, F.N. Padgham, had contacted the Royal Mint concerning the production of this particular crown.  The initial requirements were:       After reviewing two designs, the States on April 20, 1965, made two suggestions.  First, the States desired a decrease in the size of the shield since it was rather big.  Second, the States requested the lettering to be similar to that of the 1870 penny (so much so that an 1870 penny was forwarded to the mint for review.)

      Of the two designs, the Royal Mint adapted sketch “B” with the two modifications.  The first modification was to reverse the positions of “BAILIWICK OF JERSEY” and “FIVE SHILLINGS” so that the former was below the shield and the latter above it.  The second modification was to slightly reduce the size of the lettering. 
      The cost of a proof set to the States was 5/- for each coin and 3/6 for the case.  Originally, the Mint quoted the States a price of 2/6d for each crown, however the States wanted a “Grade 4” coin versus a “Grade 3.”  Per the Royal Mint documents, “It is essential that these proof coins should be acceptable in America and we are therefore agreeable to them being produced by the former method and are prepared to pay the extra price of 2/6d per coin.”2  In 1967 British dealers were selling the Jersey proof crown set for around £4. 

      The cost of the general circulation issue was £40/10/0 per thousand.  These coins were “going so well” that an additional 200,000 pieces were ordered on May 31, 1966. 

Things to note:
Jersey's third set of banknotes uses this portrait, which is copied from a painting by Norman Hepple.  The portrait shows Her Majesty's attire in the regalia of the Order of the Garter and was commissioned by the States of Jersey.  The original painting hangs in the entrance to the Jersey States Chamber in the States Building, St. Helier, Jersey.









The Obverse from a 1945 One Twelfth of a Shilling









The Reverse of the 1960 Commemorative





The 1960 One Fourth of a Shilling

1.  MINT 20/4132, Jersey:  error in manufacture of 1d coins in 1960 proof sets.  1968 Jan 01 - 1970 Dec 31.  The Public Record Office, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK.

2.  MINT 20/3031, Jersey:  Crown pieces.  1964-1965.  The Public Record Office, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK.



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Twelve Pence to a Shilling - Queen Victoria,
Twelve Pence to a Shilling - King Edward VII,
Twelve Pence to a Shilling - King George V,
Twelve Pence to a Shilling - King George VI,
Twelve Pence to a Shilling - Queen Elizabeth II,

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Starting in 1963 the States issued 10 shillings, one, five and ten pounds notes.